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Chalmeans worship four spiritual entities as true gods, and believe that all things were made by one or more of them. The Chalmean gods are moral gods in the sense that morality is the proper way for the universe to be ordered. Of course, each of the Four has a different idea of what that proper order is, and so conflict and contradiction in the universe are understood as manifestations of this cosmic conflict between the four archetypical gods: the mother, the father, the trickster and the hero.
 
Chalmeans worship four spiritual entities as true gods, and believe that all things were made by one or more of them. The Chalmean gods are moral gods in the sense that morality is the proper way for the universe to be ordered. Of course, each of the Four has a different idea of what that proper order is, and so conflict and contradiction in the universe are understood as manifestations of this cosmic conflict between the four archetypical gods: the mother, the father, the trickster and the hero.
   
The archetypical mother of Chalmean mythology is Mâkexí', the creator goddess. She made the material world out of love for her husband the Sun'', ''Séba'''''. The particulars of those circumstances are inconsistent, there being many legends about it, but they always have in common her role as creator. '''Mâkexí is portrayed as loving, kind, and all-forgiving, a motherly, nurturing figure, but she is also very demanding of his man the Sun, and lacking in character and strenght. The world she created became his husband's main occupation, and he is so busy watching over it and the humans he made to inhabit it that she gets jealous. she isn't vengeful towards him or the world, but shows little initiative of her own. In a way, watching over the world is a way to lift a weight off Séba's shoulders, and alleviating his responsabilities allows him to pay proper attention to his wife. This interpretation of the legend is particularly popular with women. Séba is the archetypical father, serious, strong, concerned with the well-being of all, and provider of light and stability to the universe. He is, however, unforgiving and headstrong. He created the spiritual realm, where the dreams of Akûnaxá''', the offspring of Mâkexí and Séba's union, might inhabit, so that she wouldn't feel alone. Eventually, however, Akûnaxá's dreams became violent and unruly, trying constantly to change the world her parents had created, which made Mâkexí very sad. Legend has it rain is Mâkexí's tears of sorrow over the corruption of her creation in the form of deserts, mountains, fields of ice, and death.
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The archetypical mother of Chalmean mythology is Mâkexí', the creator goddess. She made the material world out of love for her husband the Sun'', ''Séba'''''.'' '''The particulars of those circumstances are inconsistent, there being many legends about it, but they always have in common her role as creator.''' '''Mâkexí is portrayed as loving, kind, and all-forgiving, a motherly, nurturing figure, but she is also very demanding of his man the Sun, and lacking in character and strenght. The world she created became his husband's main occupation, and he is so busy watching over it and the humans he made to inhabit it that she gets jealous. she isn't vengeful towards him or the world, but shows little initiative of her own. In a way, watching over the world is a way to lift a weight off Séba's shoulders, and alleviating his responsabilities allows him to pay proper attention to his wife. This interpretation of the legend is particularly popular with women. Séba is the archetypical father, serious, strong, concerned with the well-being of all, and provider of light and stability to the universe. He is, however, unforgiving and headstrong. He created the spiritual realm, where the dreams of Akûnaxá', the offspring of Mâkexí and Séba's union, might inhabit, so that she wouldn't feel alone. Eventually, however, Akûnaxá's dreams became violent and unruly, trying constantly to change the world her parents had created, which made Mâkexí very sad. Legend has it rain is Mâkexí's tears of sorrow over the corruption of her creation in the form of deserts, mountains, fields of ice, and death.
   
 
So in order to protect the world, Séba created humans as stewards of creation. He made humans in his image, but lesser and material. He gave them a mind so that they could understand the order of the world, strong hands so that they could put it in order, and strong hearts to fight off the Akûnaxá's capricious dreams or bad spirits. Finally, Akûnaxá saw the beauty of humans and wanted a lover for herself. She dreamts endlessly of him. She dreamt him the opposite of his father, with whom she had grown apart; wild, agile, with a sense of humor and a free spirit, unconcerned with tradition and loyal only to his own heart. However, as the young woman she was, her heart was whimsical and she dreamt it in a thousand different ways: sometimes he was tall, sometimes he was short, sometimes he loved her unconditionally, sometimes he was distant and aloof. Sometimes he was reflexive and intellectual, and sometimes a man of action. All in all, Akûnaxá represents change, both good and bad. She might be capricious and harmful, but without her the world would be dead, immobile and frozen in the state Mâkexí made it.
 
So in order to protect the world, Séba created humans as stewards of creation. He made humans in his image, but lesser and material. He gave them a mind so that they could understand the order of the world, strong hands so that they could put it in order, and strong hearts to fight off the Akûnaxá's capricious dreams or bad spirits. Finally, Akûnaxá saw the beauty of humans and wanted a lover for herself. She dreamts endlessly of him. She dreamt him the opposite of his father, with whom she had grown apart; wild, agile, with a sense of humor and a free spirit, unconcerned with tradition and loyal only to his own heart. However, as the young woman she was, her heart was whimsical and she dreamt it in a thousand different ways: sometimes he was tall, sometimes he was short, sometimes he loved her unconditionally, sometimes he was distant and aloof. Sometimes he was reflexive and intellectual, and sometimes a man of action. All in all, Akûnaxá represents change, both good and bad. She might be capricious and harmful, but without her the world would be dead, immobile and frozen in the state Mâkexí made it.

Revision as of 20:45, 9 December 2010

The mythology of a people is a very important, and tends to define religion. In a pre-science era, people had no way to explain things, with the exception of the stories they would pass on, as modern day bedtime stories are used to explain things to little kids who aren't able to understand the science. This page will show all of the mythologies for the peoples around the world. If you have a story to add, create the page for it, and link it to here under the correct category.

Format

The following is the format of how tales are to be listed

Title(and link to the page), era(Whether it's the proto-culture, ancient, .etc), Type


Types:

Mythology: Set in prehistoric times, use grandiose characters, and are considered true and sacred.

Legends: Stories that are told, set in modern or near modern times(Compared to when it was begun), and is generally considered true

Folktales: Stories that are told that can be set in any time and place, and are generally considered to be just stories.


Also, certain common myths can have the same name and topic(Such as the Origin of Man), but they must have the culture;s name in parenthesis.

Southwestern Continent

Sbakaz

Origin of Man, Proto, Mythology

Man Refuses to Bow, Proto, Mythology

Man and the Γoddom, Proto, Mythology

The Vüm and the Zavum, Proto, Folktale

Nightstalkers, Proto, Legend

Tree Spirits, Proto, Legend

Isle of Chalmea

Chalmeans worship four spiritual entities as true gods, and believe that all things were made by one or more of them. The Chalmean gods are moral gods in the sense that morality is the proper way for the universe to be ordered. Of course, each of the Four has a different idea of what that proper order is, and so conflict and contradiction in the universe are understood as manifestations of this cosmic conflict between the four archetypical gods: the mother, the father, the trickster and the hero.

The archetypical mother of Chalmean mythology is Mâkexí', the creator goddess. She made the material world out of love for her husband the Sun, Séba. The particulars of those circumstances are inconsistent, there being many legends about it, but they always have in common her role as creator. Mâkexí is portrayed as loving, kind, and all-forgiving, a motherly, nurturing figure, but she is also very demanding of his man the Sun, and lacking in character and strenght. The world she created became his husband's main occupation, and he is so busy watching over it and the humans he made to inhabit it that she gets jealous. she isn't vengeful towards him or the world, but shows little initiative of her own. In a way, watching over the world is a way to lift a weight off Séba's shoulders, and alleviating his responsabilities allows him to pay proper attention to his wife. This interpretation of the legend is particularly popular with women. Séba is the archetypical father, serious, strong, concerned with the well-being of all, and provider of light and stability to the universe. He is, however, unforgiving and headstrong. He created the spiritual realm, where the dreams of Akûnaxá', the offspring of Mâkexí and Séba's union, might inhabit, so that she wouldn't feel alone. Eventually, however, Akûnaxá's dreams became violent and unruly, trying constantly to change the world her parents had created, which made Mâkexí very sad. Legend has it rain is Mâkexí's tears of sorrow over the corruption of her creation in the form of deserts, mountains, fields of ice, and death.

So in order to protect the world, Séba created humans as stewards of creation. He made humans in his image, but lesser and material. He gave them a mind so that they could understand the order of the world, strong hands so that they could put it in order, and strong hearts to fight off the Akûnaxá's capricious dreams or bad spirits. Finally, Akûnaxá saw the beauty of humans and wanted a lover for herself. She dreamts endlessly of him. She dreamt him the opposite of his father, with whom she had grown apart; wild, agile, with a sense of humor and a free spirit, unconcerned with tradition and loyal only to his own heart. However, as the young woman she was, her heart was whimsical and she dreamt it in a thousand different ways: sometimes he was tall, sometimes he was short, sometimes he loved her unconditionally, sometimes he was distant and aloof. Sometimes he was reflexive and intellectual, and sometimes a man of action. All in all, Akûnaxá represents change, both good and bad. She might be capricious and harmful, but without her the world would be dead, immobile and frozen in the state Mâkexí made it.

One night, she dreamt of a sexual encounter with him and, while asleep, she masturbated. She became pregnant as a result, impregnated by her dreaming, and gave birth to Loxontô. Just like she had dreamt him, he was fickle and everchanging, his form always in flux. He was always a free spirit, always wild, but in all other things he is inconsistent. Some days he is her devoted lover, but most times he wanders off into the world to seek adventure and thrill. Loxontô is the lord of luck, and legend has it he has been a major force in human history, fighting on the side of one king or another on whim alone. He is the hero with a thousand faces, the irreflexive thrillseeker.

Central Continent

Gods of the Tll-Ikish

Northeastern Continent

Mevcéṣ